June 2005 - Posts

Use all the resources at your disposal

Today I sent out the traditional 'I'm leaving but I love you all so much' email at work. I now have 5 working days left. People I have talked to in the last couple of weeks already knew, but I've been working in Microsoft IT for over 9 years so I have worked with a lot of people.

It was really hard remembering everyone - I had been writing down a list on post-it pads for a couple of days. So if its 2008 and you are reading this blog post and thinking 'Why didn't he email me', then I'm very sorry. I didn't include Bill on my farewell email as we are not on first name terms, but I did get to include Ron Markezich - the CIO - as I worked with him before he was quite as important. Will he show up for my leaving drinks? Who knows - but he sent a nice reply to my email as did many other folks, several assuring me that I can come back any time.

If the 'experiment', as I am currently calling quitting my job without another job to go to, fails miserably I would have no problem going back to Microsoft so its good to leave somewhere near the top of my game (I hope) with a reputation that means people would have you back.

So farewell Microsoft, you have been good to me.....

Don't burn your bridges
Today I sent out the traditional 'I'm leaving but I love you all so much' email at work. I now have 5 working days left. People I have talked to in the last couple of weeks already knew, but I've been working in Microsoft IT for over 9 years so I have worked with a lot of people.It was really hard remembering everyone - I had been writing down a list on post-it pads for a couple of days. So if its 2008 and you are reading this blog post and thinking 'Why didn't he email me', then I'm very sorry. I didn't include Bill on my farewell email as we are not on first name terms, but I did get to include Ron Markezich - the CIO - as I worked with him before he was quite as important. Will he show up for my leaving drinks? Who knows - but he sent a nice reply to my email as did many other folks, several assuring me that I can come back any time.If the 'experiment', as I am currently calling quitting my job without another job to go to, fails miserably I would have no problem going back to Microsoft so its good to leave somewhere near the top of my game (I hope) with a reputation that means people would have you back. So farewell Microsoft, you have been good to me.....

 

The beginning...
My parents tell a tale of the child who said he would be a millionaire by the time he was 18 if they bought him a computer so he could write video games. Well I got the computer but the million never happened. I spent too many hours playing the games that others had written, sometimes typing in thousands of hex digits from the computer magazines of the 1980s, hoping that I didn't mistype a single one. I had learned BASIC at school and wrote small games for my own enjoyment. My dad typed one of them up on a typewriter at work so that I could send it into a magazine - they didn't want it. I taught myself machine code, hand assembling the code until I had enough money to buy an assembler. The assembler was written in basic and was full of bugs. I fixed them all, speeded up the program and sent it back to the company that made it - they didn't even say thank you. By now we had a printer, a tiny Radio Shack plotter that printed on 3 inch wide rolls of shiny toilet paper. The games had got longer and took a long time to print but I sent them in to the magazines anyway - they still didn't want them. The final insult was printing a game almost identical to mine the month after my rejection. I had no clue about magazine lead times and some of the code looked awfully similar to mine so that was the last time I tried to make any money from a video game. I retired aged 17 having never seen my name in print with a grand profit of zero. Sorry mum and dad.

 

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